Quick takes

ADDITION: Sales agent Bryce Custer is the newest member of JJ Guida Airport Realty’s commercial operations.

Custer has experience in commercial real estate, including acquisition, disposition and development of office, retail and industrial projects. His current focus is serving the needs of the petrochemical, oil and gas, derivative industries and energy service companies capitalizing on the drilling and exploration of the Utica/Marcellus shale in Eastern Ohio and the West Virginia Panhandle.

His primary focus is in the area of site selection for industrial clients utilizing rail throughout Ohio and West Virginia and barges along the Ohio River, according to officials.

Custer is the founder of Bryce A. Custer Enterprises and he also is affiliated with NAI Spring Commercial Real Estate Services in Canton. He can be reached at (330) 418-9287.

Canceled: Pipeline company TransCanada said Thursday it’s cancelling a plan to build a pipeline that would ship 1.1 million barrels of oil per day from Western Canada to the Atlantic coast.

TransCanada Chief Executive Officer Russ Girling said in a statement that “after careful review of changed circumstances, we will be informing the National Energy Board” it won’t go ahead. He didn’t specify reasons but Alberta’s oil sands growth has slowed with the decline in the price of oil and there was stiff environmental opposition in Quebec.

Girling had previously called the pipeline a historic opportunity to connect the oil resources of Canada’s west to eastern consumers. He’d noted the oil could be shipped to the U.S. Eastern Seaboard, Asia and Europe.

Supporters said the pipeline was necessary to decrease reliance on the U.S., which takes 97 percent of Canada’s energy exports. Alberta has the world’s third largest oil reserves, with 170 billion barrels of proven reserves.

Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre, who has opposed the pipeline on environmental grounds, said he was thrilled to see it abandoned.

New prices: Netflix is raising the price for its most popular U.S. video streaming plan by 10 percent– a move aimed at bringing in more money to outbid HBO, Amazon and other rivals for addictive shows such as “Stranger Things.”

The change announced Thursday affects most of Netflix’s 53 million U.S. subscribers.

Netflix will now charge $11 per month instead of $10 for a plan that includes HD and allows people to simultaneously watch programs on two different Internet-connected devices.

The price for another plan that includes ultra-high definition, or 4K, video, is going up by 17 percent, to $14 from $12 a month. A plan that limits subscribers to one screen at a time without high-definition will remain at $8 a month.

The increase will be the first in two years for Netflix, although it won’t seem that way for millions of subscribers. That’s because Netflix temporarily froze its rates for long-time subscribers the last two times it raised its prices, delaying the most recent increases until the second half of last year for them.

Netflix isn’t giving anyone a break this time around. It will start e-mailing notifications about the new prices to affected subscribers Oct. 19, giving them 30 days to accept the higher rates, switch to a cheaper plan or cancel the service.

The price increase are being driven by Netflix’s desire to boost its profits as it spends more money to finance a critically acclaimed slate of original programming that includes shows such as “House of Cards,” “Orange Is The New Black,” and “The Crown,” in addition to “Stranger Things.”

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