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Upper Ohio Valley Camera Club meets

March 20, 2013
Weirton Daily Times

WINTERSVILLE, Ohio - The Upper Ohio Valley Camera Club announced the winners of the February competition.

The print winners for the topic of the month "Winter Scenes" were Claudia Norris, first place; Karen Tindor, second place; and Diane Bannister, third place. In the open category, the winners included Dave Rees and Norris, first place; Deb Snider, second place; and Sam Rees, third place. The special effects winners were Dave Rees, first place; Steve Roberts, second place; and Barb Momyer, third place. The winners' pictures can be found on Facebook at the Upper Ohio Valley Camera Club page.

The slide winners for the topic "Winter Scenes" were Norris and Steve Whiting, first place; and Judy Whiting, second place. The open category winners included Norris, first place; and Steve Whiting and Judy Whiting, second place. The special effects winners were Norris, first place; and Steve Whiting, second place.

Prior to the competition, J.D. Mihopulos gave a digital slide presentation of wedding pictures he had taken.

The February workshop was presented by some of the camera club members on the topic of photographing "Waterfalls and Wildflowers." President Steve Whiting presented the major part of the workshop. He spoke about tips for shooting pictures of waterfalls. Some of the tips were: have on hand different camera lenses, such as wide angle and telephoto; use a plastic bag to change lenses so debris doesn't fall in the camera; use a polarizer filter to cut down on glare if needed; take photos from different views; check what time of the day offers the best lighting; for damp places or damp days, use a plastic, see-through tint cap to cover the camera with a hole cut for the lens; and use a chamois cloth to wipe off damp lenses.

Whiting talked about manual adjustments for the camera to get various degrees of what's called "silky" water, meaning water looks "fluffy." He passed around enlarged photographs which had examples of the varying degrees of "fluffy" water.

Sam Rees also passed around examples of pictures he and his father Dave had taken of waterfalls and streams with various degrees of silky water by making different manual adjustments on the camera. Members were told they can find examples of these by doing a Google search of "How to Photograph Silky Water."

Vice President Debra Snider spoke about shooting photos of wildflowers. Some of her suggestions were to get close to the ground and aim upward and use clips to move out of the picture weeds or other unwanted items. She suggested using a white piece of poster board to reflect light on flowers, photographing with natural light and using the flash.

Whiting added members could use a light disc or light modifier or reflector to change or enhance the lighting, although it would require an assistant to hold the reflector. Reflectors can be purchased in different sizes from photo supply stores.

Becky and Stephen Mihopulos also contributed to the workshop.

The camera club has monthly competitions for slides taken with film cameras. Members encourage area photographers to enter slide pictures, whether new or old. Those interested in participating with slides or for more information about the club, contact Steve Whiting, at (740) 546-3923.

 
 

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